Retiring TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1

Our REST APIs and website will require the use of TLSv1.2 on October 24, 2020. TLS 1.2 was published as RFC 5246 in 2008.

All major web browsers (Chrome, Edge, Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Safari) have already disabled TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1. Most modern programming languages have support for TLS 1.2.

Integrations written in Java 6 and Python 2.6 do not have TLS 1.2 support.

References

REST Compliant Response From Email Validation API

The GET Method on the REST API endpoint /api/validations/addresses/:addressToValidate has been updated to return a JSON object. Previously, this endpoint was returning an array. The POST Method response remains unchanged.

An example GET request and response has been added to the Mailsac REST API documentation.

Email validation via the Mailsac Website is still available to all registered customers. An email address can be checked for valid format and if it is associated with any known disposable email services.

New Delete Messages Flag When Releasing a Private Email Address

When releasing a private address, there is now an option to “empty the inbox” – deleting all messages associated with the private address. You can find the option by clicking the settings button when managing your private addresses.

The API endpoint DELETE /api/addresses/:email now supports the query string deleteAddressMessages. When deleteAddressMessages=true is passed, all messages associated with the inbox will be deleted.

Please note that all messages are deleted, including starred/saved messages. It is immediate and irreversible.

Authentication Changes

Mailsac now requires authentication on all API routes and many parts of the website. The API key for your account can be created and viewed from the dashboard. If you are using the website to view emails you will need to create an account and sign in to view the body, images, and headers.

API Authentication

Many API routes required authentication prior to this change. If you are a customer with an existing API key and using it to make your API requests, there are no changes you need to make.

If you were using anonymous access, you will need to create an account and create an API key.

There are three methods for authenticating to the API. HTTP Header, Query String Parameter, and Request JSON Body. To use the HTTP Header create the request header Mailsac-Key and use the value of your API key. To use the query string parameter append the query string parameter _mailsacKey to the query section (after ?) in the url. Example: https://mailsac.com/api/addresses/test@example.com/messages?_mailsacKey=eoj1mn7x5y61w0egs25j6xrv
During a POST or PUT operation a JSON field _mailsacKey can be used.

For a complete list of API Routes check out the API documentation.

Website Authentication

The content of the most recent email received is still available without logging in. Older messages, images, and headers will require an account. You can register for an account for free.

Open Source Spam Processing

Mailsac has added a new spamminess indicator in the API.

New messages will have a spam property that’s a score between 0.0 and 1.0. 1.0 indicates a high likelihood of spam. The system will get smarter over time.

The main component of spam detection is a time tested approach called Naive Bayes Classifier. The core of the code is open source at github.com/mailsac/spam-classifier, though a little special sauce is applied, too. This classifier library is ready to use and includes a simple API server and a terminal training tool.

In the works are additional spam classification projects using three different deep learning techniques: random forest, a long short term neural network, and a combination recurrent network + liquid state machine with spike dependent plasticity. The goal is to open source the useful pieces of the coming spam classifiers.

Parsed Links on Messages API

Message metadata will now include pre-parsed links. This enhancement should make automation even easier.

 

For example, say you want to test email signup confirmations on your website. Normally you would need to request the inbox for the test inbox:

GET /api/addresses/mytestemail@example.com/messages
[{
  _id: 'y39sak29gaer-0',
  subject: 'Confirm your email address',
  from: [{ address: 'noreply@sampleservice.com' }],
  to: [{ address: 'mytestemail@example.com' }]
  // more fields
}]

then download the full email or body:

GET /api/dirty/mytestemail@example.com/y39sak29gaer-0
<div>
  <a href="https://www.sampleservice.com/email-confirmation/39349234">Confirm your email!</a>
</div>

then parse the contents and search for the link.

Now the message metadata from the first request will also include a links array of strings:

GET /api/addresses/mytestemail@example.com/messages
[{
  _id: 'y39sak29gaer-0',
  subject: 'Confirm your email address',
  from: [{ address: 'noreply@sampleservice.com' }],
  to: [{ address: 'mytestemail@example.com' }]
  links: ['https://www.sampleservice.com/email-confirmation/39349234']
}]

This feature should save you a roundtrip to the API and let you not worry about properly parsing HTML links.

 

API Reference

 

Faster response times on message routes

A LRU caching layer, active on each API, was added recently. Since email contents are stored separately from the database and every other microservice, many API requests will get faster. We expect faster response times for recently received messages, messages that are requested repeatedly, and any API request where the message is re-parsed in-flight.

Mailsac stores metadata about every message in MongoDB. In the interest of saving disk and RAM, the full email contents are stored across file servers. When a piece of the email is requested via the API, the full file is fetched and parsed into the desired format. Believe it or not, for Mailsac, CPU is far less resource constrained than disk and RAM, so this trade-off makes sense.

For example, when the email headers are requested, the API begins fetching the full message from the file server, parses the SMTP package, formats the headers, and sends them to the client. Fetching attachments is similar – when an attachment is requested, the API gets the original email from the file server where it is stored, extracts the attachment, and transfers it to the client.

This process involves a lot of disk IO and network latency. With the LRU cache, we seeing 80 ms – 600 ms faster requests, and the cache is used on about 45% of requests that re-parse the email.

Enhanced Outbound Sending API

Until now, all transactional messages sent through the Mailsac API only allowed text. With the latest release, the API supports HTML and attachments. Additionally supported is sending an entire raw SMTP message over the REST API.

New Transactional Email Fields

 

HTML

You can provide full HTML in the html field when doing a POST /api/outgoing-messages. This was not possible in previous versions of the API.

Attachments

Attachments can be sent and linked into the html by including an array of attachment objects in the attachments field.

Example Inline Attachment
{
  "contentDisposition": "attachment",
  "content": "3asfji32gia...93as==",
  "encoding": "base64",
  "filename": "2561a.jpg",
}
Example Attached File
{
  "cid": "F3011FGE@hsd1.ca.comcast.net.",
  "contentDisposition": "inline; filename=2561a.jpg",
  "content": "3asfji32gia...93as==",
  "encoding": "base64",
  "filename": "2561a.jpg",
}

Received Headers

Persisting received headers is now possible – send a single string or array of received headers. This allows you to receive SMTP in your application, pre-parse it, and pass along received information.

Raw SMTP over HTTP

 

If you want to test SMTP parsing or have an application that generates raw SMTP messages, put the entire SMTP contents into the raw field when doing a POST /api/outgoing-messages.

Mailsac will parse the headers, text, HTML, and attachments, then deliver it for you.

All other fields will be ignored when you send a raw message.

 

 

Read the API docs for sending transactional emails over HTTP

 

API Reference Overhaul

The API documentation received a fresh new look using a fork of the popular Slate docs framework.

new-docs-look
Significant update to our documentation

API endpoints should be easier to navigate. Many request and response examples were added. Endpoints for downloading attachments are easier to find.

In the coming weeks there will be updates to the docs for the SMTP Web Socket API and the Webhook API, including new examples and guides.

View the new API Docs